The heavy toll of overfishing

The world is missing out on nutrition for millions of people.

23 February 2021 | Supplements

The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) - an environmental not-for-profit - says the world is missing out on enough protein to meet the annual needs of 72 million people, because not all fisheries have been sustainably managed.

Seafood is a key source of nutrients and protein and plays a vital role in the diets of many. Over 3.3 billion people around the world get at least 20% of their daily animal protein intake from fish. As the global population continues to rise, it is increasing pressure on this valuable, natural resource. Global consumption of seafood has risen by 122% in the last 30 years.

Over a third of global fish stocks are now fished beyond sustainable limits, with this trend continuing to worsen slightly.

Latest estimates suggest that if global fisheries had been better managed, 16 million tonnes more seafood could have been harvested every year, helping to feed a rapidly growing population.

The MSC’s analysis shows, if globally adopted, sustainable fishing practices would increase the additional protein available to meet the annual needs of a population equal to that of the South Africa and its bordered neighbouring countries.

The global population is set to reach 10 billion by 2050 and food production urgently needs to be made sustainable and equitable to ensure healthy diets for all. Effective management of fisheries allows stocks and ecosystems to recover, in turn increasing the amount of fish that can be sustainably harvested in perpetuity.

Dr Rohan Currey, Chief Science and Standards Officer of the MSC said: “Tackling over-fishing is a ‘win-win’ for our planet. By conserving our rich marine resources, we also enable more people to have the protein they need to live healthily. We know the practices that need to be adopted in order to enable sustainable fishing. What we need now is international will and cooperation to implement these across all waters, borders and species globally. Future generations have the right to sustainable food sources. As the global population continues to rise, the need to harness our natural resources responsibly is more urgent than ever.”

In recent years, more fisheries than ever have been adopting sustainable fishing practices. In 2020 there were 409 fisheries around the world certified to the MSC’s sustainability standard, with another 89 undergoing assessment.

To be MSC certified, a fishery must show the fish stock is healthy, that it minimises its impact on the environment and has effective management in place.

To accelerate change, fisheries however need the support of governments to ensure that catch limits are in line with scientific advice, that illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing is tackled, and that harmful subsidies which encourage over-fishing around the world, are eliminated.

Overfishing in Africa

More than a third of fish stocks around the world are overfished, yet sustainable fisheries are more productive and resilient to change according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation.

The World Bank has estimated that the amount of fishing in African waters would need to be reduced by more than 50 percent in order to reach an equilibrium that protects both fish stocks and profits.

The MSC works with fisheries around the world to combat overfishing, including the Namibian Hake fisheries.

Similar News

 

Weathering the storm?

1 week ago - 23 February 2021 | Supplements

Fisheries and its associated industries continue to be a vibrant sector despite numerous challenges. These include, but are not limited to, the most recent blows...

New look for Hangana Seafood

1 week ago - 23 February 2021 | Supplements

Hangana Seafood, a subsidiary of the Ohlthaver & List (O&L) Group, recently launched their new logo. The idea behind the change is the company’s...

Etosha Fishing: Serious about growth at home despite difficult...

1 week ago - 23 February 2021 | Supplements

The three-year ban imposed on pilchard fishing in 2017 remains in place without any clear decision by government on the way forward. Furthermore, Etosha...

The preferred seaport in Africa

1 week ago - 23 February 2021 | Supplements

The Namibian Ports Authority (Namport) handled 20 000 MT of bulk sulphur destined for the Zambian market, when a bulk sulphur bagging operation took place...

Your trusted medical supplier

1 week ago - 23 February 2021 | Supplements

Westmed, a local supplier of medical goods and services, was established in 2018. According to general manager Mandi van der Lith, the company’s vision is...

Fishing resource must contribute to shared prosperity ...

1 week ago - 23 February 2021 | Supplements

“Government should generate enough financial resources to address the challenges of poverty, unemployment, and under development. Marine resources should play a positive role in ensuring...

Namibian hake industry makes history

1 week ago - 23 February 2021 | Supplements

The Namibia hake trawl and longline fishery became the first in Namibia, and the second in Africa, to meet the globally recognised standard for sustainable...

A seabird success story for conservation

1 week ago - 23 February 2021 | Supplements

Namibia’s hake demersal longline fishery has reduced seabird mortality by an impressive 98%. This is a huge success story for conservation and for the Southern...

The glue that holds the fishing industry together

1 week ago - 23 February 2021 | Supplements

The fishing sector is not only structured around those providing services to the industry, with associations like the Namibian Hake Association and the Monk and...

Kanime steers Namport

1 week ago - 23 February 2021 | Supplements

The Namibian Ports Authority (Namport) welcomed Andrew Kanime as its new chief executive officer (CEO) on 1 November 2020 for the next five years. Kanime...

Latest News

Planning Walvis Bay’s future

9 hours ago | Local News

Walvis Bay The Department of Community and Economic Development recently launched the commencement of the Local Economic Development for Walvis Bay. The bid...

Council wants to be planning...

9 hours ago | Local News

Walvis Bay • [email protected] The Walvis Bay municipal management committee approved an application to be submitted to the Minister of Urban and Rural Development...

House issue tackled in Walvis...

9 hours ago | Local News

Walvis Bay • [email protected] The Walvis Bay municipal council is devising strategies to tackle the housing crisis in Walvis Bay. Mayor Trevino Forbes...

Grumpy’s Fishing Report

10 hours ago | Fishing

February is truly one of the top fishing months along our beautiful coastline. The first interclub competition was also held at the Winston wreck area...

Grumpy’s Fishing Report

10 hours ago | Fishing

February is truly one of the top fishing months along our beautiful coastline. The first interclub competition was also held at the Winston wreck area...

African Vocals entoesiasties oor liefdadigheid

10 hours ago | Local News

Swakopmund • [email protected] Die a capella-groep, African Vocals, het onlangs ’n liefdadigheidsprojek in Swakopmund se DRC- informele nedersetting van stapel gestuur met die doel...

Vroulike taxibestuurder maak wesenlike verskil

11 hours ago | Local News

Swakopmund • [email protected] Die plaaslike entrepreneur Lavinia Ngodji (27) verbreek stereotipes deurdat sy, as ’n vroulike taxibestuurder, ’n veiliger opsie vir ander vroue en kinders...

Anguish as footballers die in...

1 day - 01 March 2021 | Accidents

Henties Bay/Swakopmund/Windhoek • [email protected] and [email protected] Young soccer players from Henties Bay endured a horrific ordeal on Saturday night when an accident...

Namport and Namfi partner

1 day - 01 March 2021 | Business

Walvis Bay •[email protected] The Namibian Ports Authority (Namport) and the Namibian Maritime Fishing Institute (Namfi) signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU).According to Namfi...

Load More